Welcome to the Curriculum & Leadership Journal website.
To receive our fortnightly Email Alert,
please click on the blue menu item below.
Curriculum & Leadership Journal
An electronic journal for leaders in education
ISSN: 1448-0743
Follow us on twitter

New publications

Fair Society, Healthy Lives – The Marmot Review Final Report

University College London, February 2010

The aim of the Review was to propose an evidence-based strategy for reducing health inequalities from 2010. The strategy includes policies and interventions that address the social determinants of health inequalities. The Review followed the publication of the global Commission on Social Determinants of Health, which advocated that national governments develop and implement strategies and policies suited to their particular national context aimed at improving health equity. The English review is a response to that recommendation and to the government's commitment to reducing health inequalities in England. It is anticipated that the Review will also have relevance for other countries developing strategies aimed at tackling health inequalities. See also the related What's new item in this edition of Curriculum Leadership.

KLA

Subject Headings

Intellect
Great Britain
Equality
Social classes
Parent and child
Health

Metaphors & Analogies: Power Tools for Teaching Any Subject

Rick Wormeli
Stenhouse Publishers, October 2009

Metaphors and analogies are presented as 'power tools' that can make the abstract concrete, and allow students to make conceptual connections. The book aims to help teachers effectively and strategically use metaphors to help students create, discover and deconstruct effective comparisons. Topics include using metaphors in content subjects; metaphor with English-language learners; developing visual metaphors; and teaching students what to do when metaphors break down. Adapted from publisher's description.

KLA

Subject Headings

Classroom activities
Pedagogy
Teaching and learning

Students' Voices: Learning with Technologies. Students' Expectations About Learning with Technologies: A Literature Review

Kathryn Moyle, Susanne Owen

Australian students' opinions and expectations about ICT and education are investigated in this report. It is based on literature published since 2002 that relates to learning with ICT in schools, VET programs, and teacher education programs. The report notes that research to date has often focused on the technological aspects of ICT use, rather than social issues surrounding it. However, there is some research evidence that ICT in schools focuses unduly on basic tasks and presentation, and that teaching practices often were not changed to help students develop higher order skills when using the technology. A detailed section on further reading is included. The full report is available online.

KLA

Subject Headings

Information and Communications Technology (ICT)
Surveys
Students

From Literature Circles to Blogs: Activities for Engaging Professional Learning Communities

Susan Church, Margaret Swain
Stenhouse,  2009

This text aims to help teachers build trust and rapport with peers, and to expand the possibilities of self-directed professional growth. It is organised around specific learning experiences and can be easily adapted to individual needs. Chapters, each focusing on a particular type of learning experience, cover topics such as collaborative learning, professional reading, examining student work, and examining teaching practices. Examples of how to apply the learning experience in specific contexts, grades and subject areas are provided, as are suggestions for incorporating technology. Adapted from publisher's description.

KLA

Subject Headings

School culture
Professional development
Teaching profession

Who is Heading for HE? Young People's Perceptions of, and Decisions About, Higher Education

Peter Bates, Emma Pollard, Tom Usher, Joy Oakley

Drawing on interviews with 11,000 17-year-olds, this report examines the attitudes of young people in England toward higher education. Attitudes were generally positive, with most young people acknowledging higher eduction's economic and social  benefits. This was especially the case for those from higher socioeconomic backgrounds. In deciding whether to undertake further studies, issues of cost played a part but were assigned less importance than academic interest or the desire to work full-time. Variations in subject selection were associated with social class, gender and ethnicity; interest in STEM degrees was associated with learning experiences and career considerations. Steps need to be taken to increase student numbers, and to minimise 'leakage' away from higher education participation. The full report is available online.

KLA

Subject Headings

Vocational guidance
Tertiary education
Great Britain
Transitions in schooling

International Thematic Probe: The Influence of Relative Age on Learner Attainment and Development

Caroline Sharp, Nalia George, Claire Sargent, Sharon O'Donnell, et al.
INCA, February 2009

Drawing on 18 research studies and professional correspondence, this report examines the extent to which relative age affects the attainment of learners in learning contexts internationally. Younger students in a year group were found to demonstrate lower achievement in mathematics, reading and writing; to be more likely to repeat a year of schooling; and to be more likely to be identified as having special needs. Relative age effects on attainment are greatest during early primary level, remain significant throughout primary school, and exist at non-significant levels during secondary school. Apart from introducing age-standardised tests, there was little evidence to support particular policies for reducing age-related attainment effects. The full report is available online.

KLA

Subject Headings

Primary education
Educational evaluation
Great Britain
Education policy