Welcome to the Curriculum & Leadership Journal website.
To receive our fortnightly Email Alert,
please click on the blue menu item below.
Curriculum & Leadership Journal
An electronic journal for leaders in education
ISSN: 1448-0743
Follow us on twitter

Abstracts

Foregrounding the disciplines in secondary literacy teaching and learning: a call for change

Volume 52 Number 2, October 2008; Pages 96–106
Elizabeth Birr Moje

KLA

Subject Heading

Using assessment to nurture knowledge-rich creativity

Volume 45 Number 3, 13 August 2008; Pages 309–317

Within fine arts education, the notion of creativity as spontaneous, involuntary and individual presents problems for assessment. This notion of creativity as ‘outside any normative forms of knowledge, understand and skill’ emerged as part of the Romantic period’s reaction against the rationalism of the Enlightenment: artistic creation was now seen to emerge from the private imagination of some individuals able to access visions of a reality which is at once superior, more ‘primitive’ and more authentic than ordinary perception. This ‘primitive authenticity’ has been successively associated with ancient Greece, medieval Europe, the individual’s inner mind as conceived by the Romantics, and Freud’s concept of the unconscious. Understood in these terms creativity can only be inhibited by assessment and feedback, which impose inappropriate standards. Efforts to overcome this problem by assessing students' work intuitively, on the basis of 'qualities which go beyond what is immediately apparent', involve ‘occult-like’ notions incompatible with a community of practice. A 1996 case study found that educators who tried to apply intuitive assessment were likely to make impressionistic and ‘authoritarian’ judgments. Research overwhelmingly vindicates an alternative concept of creativity, in which its involuntary elements draw on a long period of conscious acquisition of shared knowledge and skills. Such acquisition is cognitively based and comparable to learning in the sciences. It involves reflection on the learning process and the application of ethical principles. Assessment in the fine arts should be concerned with measuring students' artistic skills, knowledge and dispositions acquired through these methods.

Key Learning Areas

The Arts

Subject Headings

Creativity
Assessment
Thought and thinking
Arts in education

Quality early childhood education and care

Volume 13 Number 1, January 2009; Pages 1–4
ISQ Briefings

KLA

Subject Heading

Assess integrative reading of images and text in group reading comprehension tests

Volume 28 Number 3,  2008; Pages 71–76
Len Unsworth,

KLA

Subject Heading

Leadership for personalising learing: critical shifts in understanding

Number 181, February 2009; Pages 3–22
George Otero, John West-Burnham

KLA

Subject Heading

Raising students' literacy achievements in secondary school: findings from teacher-researcher partnerships

Number 2,  2008; Pages 46–51
Trevor McDonald, Christina Thornley, Carla Thomson, et al.

KLA

Subject Heading

There are no Conferences available in this issue.