Reunion 1998: Chinese family dream

 

 collections_australianscreen

Reproduced courtesy of australianscreen online

Resource title: Reunion 1998: Chinese family dream

Digital resource identifier: R7197

Resource description
This film clip is about David Wang, the first Chinese-born Melbourne city councillor. David’s wife, Mabel, describes how he worked towards becoming a councillor and the impact this had in the Asian region. His daughter Lisa also talks about how important her father felt it was to be Australian and to keep Chinese traditions.

Stage of schooling: Upper Primary

CCE focus: Citizenship in a Democracy

Context
Students are able to explore how the Wang family upheld both core Australian values as well as those of a Chinese family, exploring the various layers of Australian identity. The clip also provides the opportunity to consider Australia’s ongoing connection with Asia, highlighting the importance the media in North Asian countries placed on David Wang’s success as a councillor.

Opportunities for Civics and Citizenship learning

‘Reunion 1998: Chinese family dream’ provides opportunities for students to:

  • explore Chinese and Australian values, including similarities and differences between the two

  • research how and why people migrate to Australia

  • consider whether there is a need for immigration to Australia

  • find out about current policy around immigration in Australia

  • consider what issues there might be for new immigrants in Australia, particularly in terms of identity.

Ideas for the classroom

  • Show the film clip to students, then ask them to discuss how David Wang has contributed to Australian society.

  • Explain to students that they are going to write a newspaper article about David Wang becoming a Melbourne city councillor and the importance of immigration to Australia.

  • Organise students into small groups to discuss what could be included in the article, and where they might be able to find further information about immigration to help inform their article. Ask them to take notes that might help them with their article.

  • Show the clip once more so that students may add to their notes.

  • Allow some time for students to carry out some further research about immigration, and then ask them to write their articles.

  • Complete the activity by asking some students to read their articles.